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Douglas, Paul Page

Date of birth:
December 23rd, 1919 (Paragould/Arkansas, United States)
Date of death:
December 26th, 2002 (Fort Hood/Texas, United States)
Nationality:
American

Biography

Paul Page Douglas was born December 23rd, 1919, son of Bess Douglas and Paul Page Douglas. He attended school at Paragould and graduated from High School in 1938. In the same year he took up studies at the Arkansas State Teachers College (ASTC) in Conway. Here he also received his pilot’s licence. In 1940 he joined the Arkansas National Guard and was called into active service in 1941. He started flight training on April 28th, 1941; received his wings and was commissioned as 2nd Lieutenant on December 12th , 1941. Before being sent to England, he met Sarah Lee Chandler whom he married December 23rd, 1944.
He completed 136 missions (337 operational flying hours) in his Republic P-47 Thunderbolt as Commanding Officer 396th Fighter Squadron, Second in Command 368th Fighter Group en de 36th Fighter Group. He shot down seven enemy planes and destroyed 27 on the ground.
After World War Two, Paul Page Douglas graduated from the Christian University (TCU), Fort Worth, Texas in 1948 before being stationed in Germany as Commanding Officer 22nd Fighter Squadron. In 1950 he returned to the US and was named Jet Operations Officer, Tactical Air Command Headquarters, Langley Air Force Base, Virginia. Following this he held various positions in the US and abroad.
He retired February 1st, 1970 as Commanding Officer 836th Air Division, MacDill Air Force Base, Florida in the rank of Brigadier General. Paul Page Douglas passed away December 26th, 2002. He lies buried at the Central Texas State Veteran’s Cemetery in Killeen, Texas.

Promotions:
12 december 1941: 2nd Lieutenant;
?: Major;
?: Lieutenant Colonel;
?: Colonel;
?: Brigadier General.

Career:
1940: Arkansas National Guard;
?: Commanding Officer 396th Fighter Squadron;
?: Second in Command 368th Fighter Group;
?: 36th Fighter Group;
? - 1950: Commanding Officer 22nd Fighter Squadron;
?: Jet Operations Officer, Tactical Air Command Headquarters, Langley Air Force Base, Virginia;
?: Instructor Air Ground Operations School, Ninth Air Force Headquarters;
?: Commanding Officer 21st Fighter Bomber Group;
?: North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Defense College, Paris, France;
?: Commanding Officer 1400th Operations Group, Keflavik, Iceland;
?: Chief, Investigation and Field Operations Division, Directorate of Flight Safety Research, Office of the Inspector General, Norton Air Force Base, California;
?: Commanding Officer 41st Air Division, Yokata, Japan;
January 24th ,1968: Commanding Officer 388th Tactical Fighter Wing, Korat Royal Thai Air Force Base, Thailand;
February 1969 – February 1st, 1970: Commanding Officer 836th Air Division, MacDill Air Force Base, Florida;
1 februari 1970: Discharge,
?: Purchasing Agent, Staff University of Central Arkansas.

In addition to his World War Two decorations, Paul Page Douglas was awarded another two Distinguished Flying Crosses (3 in total) and 3 Air Medals (38 in total) in Vietnam, the Legion of Merit three times, the Air Force Commendation Medal four times and an Army Commendation Medal.

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Periode:
Second World War (1939-1945)
Rank:
2nd Lieutenant
Awarded on:
December 12th, 1941
Pilot Wing
Periode:
Second World War (1939-1945)
Rank:
Major
Awarded on:
June 15th, 1944
Action:
Citation:
"For outstanding achievement while participating in aerial flight against the enemy in the European Theater of Operations from March to May 1944. As squadron commander, Major Douglas has led his squadron with distinction in a large number of difficult combat missions, maintaining the highest operational efficiency, and displaying superior tactical technique in the destruction of vital enemy installations and objectives. He has repeatedly shown fearless courage in carrying out attacks upon enemy aircraft menacing bomber formations, and through his superior flying ability and aggressive spirit has led his squadron to unusual achievements in vigorous assaults upon the enemy. His forceful leadership and high devotion to duty are in keeping with the finest traditions of the Services."
Details:
General Orders: Headquarters, 9th Air Force, General Orders No. 162 (June 15, 1944).
Distinguished Flying Cross (DFC)
Periode:
Second World War (1939-1945)
Rank:
Lieutenant Colonel
Unit:
9th Air Force
Awarded on:
December 10th, 1944
Silver Star Medal (SSM)
Action:
Citation:
"for conspicuous gallantry in action against the enemy while serving with the NINTH Air Force in the European Theater of Operations on 6 October 1955. Lieutenant Colonel Douglas demonstrated outstanding leadership on a group attack on a large number of hostile planes camouflaged in a field near Cologne, Germany. Despite intense, accurate anti-aircraft fire he skillfully directed his men to the attack, and although his own aircraft sustained serious battle damage he accounted personally for the destruction of six of the grounded aircraft. Lieutenant Colonel Douglas' calm judgment and spirited leadership on this occasion are in keeping with the highest traditions of the Armed Forces of the United States."
Details:
General Orders: Headquarters, 9th Air Force, General Orders No. 289 (December 10, 1944).
Periode:
Second World War (1939-1945)
Rank:
Lieutenant Colonel
Unit:
396th Fighter Squadron, 368th Fighter Group, 9th Air Force (396th Fighter Squadron, 368th Fighter Group, 9th Air Force)
Awarded on:
1945
Distinguished Service Cross (DSC)
Action:
Citation:
"For extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy while serving as Pilot of a P-47 Fighter Airplane in the 396th Fighter Squadron, 368th Fighter Group, NINTH Air Force, in aerial combat against enemy forces on 20 October 1944, in the European Theater of Operations. On this date, Lieutenant Colonel Douglas was returning to base as leader of a squadron of fighter aircraft with his supply of gasoline almost exhausted, when a formation of more than 20 enemy aircraft carrying bombs was observed. Completely disregarding the odds against him, he ordered all but five of his aircraft to return to base, and with this small number unhesitatingly attacked the enemy formation with such ferocity that they were forced to jettison their bombs directly over the city of Coblenz and take evasive action. In the ensuing combat, Lieutenant Colonel Douglas relentlessly pursued the enemy, destroyed three of his aircraft and damaged a fourth. His own plane was continually under attack and sustained many hits. He was painfully wounded and his airplane's right wing was set on fire, yet he managed to return to base. The extraordinary heroism and zealous devotion to duty displayed by Lieutenant Colonel Douglas on this occasion are in keeping with the highest traditions of the Armed Forces and reflect great credit upon himself, the 9th Air Force, and the United States Army Air Forces."
Details:
General Orders: Headquarters, U.S. Strategic Forces in Europe, General Orders No. 13 (1945).
Periode:
Second World War (1939-1945)
Rank:
Lieutenant Colonel
Unit:
396th Fighter Squadron, 368th Fighter Group, 9th Air Force (396th Fighter Squadron, 368th Fighter Group, 9th Air Force)
Awarded on:
June 14th, 1945
Distinguished Service Cross (DSC)
Action:
Citation:
"For extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy while serving as Pilot of a P-47 Fighter Airplane in the 396th Fighter Squadron, 368th Fighter Group, NINTH Air Force, in aerial combat against enemy forces on 14 March 1945. On this date, with only three aircraft supporting him, Colonel Douglas attacked a force of more than fifty enemy aircraft carrying bombs toward the American lines in the Remagen Bridgehead. Completely disregarding the enemy's overwhelming numerical superiority, he attacked relentlessly, compelling the hostile aircraft to jettison their bombs. In the ensuing combat Colonel Douglas destroyed three enemy planes while the aircraft he was leading destroyed seven additional enemy planes with no loss to themselves. The extraordinary heroism and determination of this officer to destroy the enemy are in keeping with the highest traditions of the Armed Forces of the United States."
Details:
Received as an Oak Leaves Cluster for on the ribbon of the first DSC.
General Orders: Headquarters, U.S. Strategic Forces in Europe, General Orders No. 69 (June 14, 1945).
Periode:
Second World War (1939-1945)
Rank:
Lieutenant Colonel
Unit:
368th Fighter Group, 9th Air Force (368th Fighter Group, 9th Air Force)
Awarded on:
July 6th, 1945
Silver Star Medal (SSM)
Action:
Citation:
"For gallantry in action while serving with the 368th Fighter Group, NINTH Air Force on 13 April 1945. Lieutenant Colonel Douglas distinguished himself by superior aerial proficiency and leadership while participating in aerial flight against the enemy in the vicinity of Jutebeg and Damm, Germany. Despite heavy haze Lieutenant Colonel Douglas led repeated attacks on two enemy airfields in the face of concentrated enemy fire at both landing grounds. The unusual courage and technical efficiency displayed by him resulted in a great blow to the enemy air forces. He personally destroyed seven aircraft and damaged another while under his brilliant direction, 16 were destroyed by his squadron and an additional four were severely damaged. The excellent combat record achieved by Lieutenant Colonel Douglas on this occasion reflects the highest distinction to himself and the Army Air Forces.
Details:
Second Silver Star Medal received in the form of a bronze oak leaf cluster to be worn on the ribbon of the first Silver Star Medal.
Periode:
Second World War (1939-1945)
Rank:
Lieutenant Colonel
Unit:
368th Fighter Group, 9th Air Force (368th Fighter Group, 9th Air Force)
Awarded on:
July 16th, 1945
Silver Star Medal (SSM)
Action:
Citation:
"For gallantry in action while serving with the 368th Fighter Group, NINTH Air Force on 12 April 1945. Despite navigational difficulties presented by adverse weather conditions, Lieutenant Colonel Douglas, while launching an assault against enemy airfields in the vicinity of Leipzig, Germany, distinguished himself by outstanding courage and brilliant leadership. Although his own aircraft sustained severe damage from intense anti-aircraft fire, he determinedly held his position in flight and directed attacks upon two airdromes, destroying seventeen of the seventy-three planes accountable to his squadron. During the course of his daring attacks, Lieutenant Colonel Douglas silenced numerous gun positions, enabling his squadron to continue their mission unimpeded. The superior airmanship and heroic devotion to duty displayed by Lieutenant Colonel Douglas on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the Army Air Forces."
Details:
Third Silver Star Medal received in the form of a second bronze oak leaf cluster to be worn on the ribbon of the first Silver Star Medal.
General Orders: Headquarters, 9th Air Force, General Orders No. 134 (July 16, 1945).
Periode:
Second World War (1939-1945)
Details:
Second Purple Heart received in the form of a bronze oak leaf cluster to be worn on the ribbon of the first Purple Heart.
Purple Heart
Periode:
Second World War (1939-1945)
Details:
Received with gold star.
Croix de Guerre (1939-1945)

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