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Nieuwste artikelen

Thirty-two days in Normandy
  • Article by Jeroen Koppes
  • Published on March 28th, 2021

Thirty-two days in Normandy

Captain Errol Stewart Gray was born April 6, 1920 in Springhill, Nova Scotia in Canada. He stood 5 feet 6, had brown hair and brown-grey eyes.[note]Statement of Service, E.S. Gray.[/note] The family consisted of father John James Gray and mother Anna Gertrude Gray. In addition to Errol, they had three other sons: John, Edward and Jim. [note] Memorial plaque, E.S. Gray.[/note] He joined the Canadian Field Force in the rank of 2nd Lieutenant. Meanwhile, he had moved to Amherst, his parents lived in Bedford. Gray worked as a technical clerk before he entered service. Since May 22, 1940, he served in the 2nd Battalion, North Nova Scotia Highlanders and so reported voluntary for service overseas. [note]Officer's Declaration Paper, E.S. Gray, June 5, 1941.[/note]

Operation Rheinübung and the sinking of the Bismarck
  • Article by Frank van der Drift
  • Published on September 13th, 2020

Operation Rheinübung and the sinking of the Bismarck

Up until 1938, Germany had never reckoned with the possibility of entering into a conflict with Great Britain in which the Kriegsmarine would play a major part. In the fall of 1938, Plan Z was launched, entailing the construction of 10 battleships, 12 large armored vessels, 4 aircraft carriers, 5 heavy cruisers, 16 light cruisers and numerous other smaller vessels.

Battle of Berlin
  • Article by Auke de Vlieger
  • Published on August 25th, 2020

Battle of Berlin

As early the summer of 1943, one thing was certain for the soldiers of the Red Army: they would end the war in Berlin at all costs. The conquest of the German capital was considered a well-deserved prize, as the fitting final phase of an unprecedented brutal and bloody war.

Landings on Gold Beach
  • Article by Pieter Schlebaum
  • Published on August 17th, 2020

Landings on Gold Beach

June 6, 1944 was a very important date for the liberation of Europe. On this day, the largest amphibious landing in the history of the European continent took place, Operation Overlord, when more than 130,000 British, American, and Canadian troops set foot on French soil in Normandy.

Landings on Juno Beach
  • Article by Pieter Schlebaum
  • Published on June 23rd, 2020

Landings on Juno Beach

June 6, 1944 was a very important date for the liberation of Europe. On this day, the largest amphibious landing in the history of the European continent took place, Operation Overlord, when more than 130,000 British, American, and Canadian troops set foot on French soil in Normandy.

Rise and fall of the Panzerarmee Afrika
  • Article by Matthias Ouwejan
  • Published on May 29th, 2020

Rise and fall of the Panzerarmee Afrika

North-Africa was a battlefront opened by Adolf Hitler in 1941 after the Italians had suffered a massive defeat in the battle of Beda Fomm against the British, between February 5 and 7, 1941. That battle was the climax of Operation Compass, which the British had launched on December 9, 1940. The Italians were then pushed back to El Agheila and as a result of the massive Allied advance of 497 miles in two months and the losses the Italians suffered, Germany got involved in the battle.