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Olympic village Berlin 1936
  • Article by Maurice Laarman
  • Published on January 30th, 2022

Olympic village Berlin 1936

In the mid-thirties, Berlin is the center of the world during the Olympic Summer Games of 1936. Adolf Hitler uses the games to show the world what Nazi-Germany is capable of. The Olympic village, built by the Germans in the close proximity of Berlin, is the temporary residence of most athletes. This article provides an overview of the construction of the village, daily life during the Games and the vacancy and the decay during and after World War Two. In addition, attention is paid to the restoration and conservation of the remains of the village following the Soviet period.

Train carriage at Compiègne
  • Article by Sjoerd de Boer
  • Published on March 7th, 2021

Train carriage at Compiègne

The First World War came to end in a forest in Compiègne, north of Paris. The French and the Germans sat facing each other in a train carriage. Hitler considered this an insult he wanted to eradicate as quickly as possible. When his armies had overrun the French in 1940, he thought he wanted to do the same by having the French sign the armistice at exactly the same location on June 21, 1940. His rants against the subsequent Treaty of Versailles, imposed on Germany, had been a recurring subject in the speeches he had held in the period in which he had evolved from an unknown into an increasingly popular figure in Bavarian and German politics. And now he turned the tables.

Nazi ship Wilhelm Gustloff
  • Article by Peter Kimenai
  • Published on January 30th, 2021

Nazi ship Wilhelm Gustloff

May 5, 1937 was an important date for the Nazi Regime in Germany. On that day the new passengerliner and cruise ship Wilhelm Gustloff was launched on the Blom & Voss shipyard in Hamburg and named after the Gauleiter Wilhelm Gustloff, leader of the Swiss nazy party.

Prisoners of War in Canada during World War II
  • Article by Jacob Benoit
  • Published on October 25th, 2020

Prisoners of War in Canada during World War II

While more than 35,000 German and Italian prisoners were kept far away from the war in prison camps, many other thousands of innocent civilians were forced to leave their houses to go live in internment camps. In 1942, more than 20,000 Japanese Canadians were transferred to these camps, and about the same number of German Canadians. These internments were to reduce the risk and fear of enemy spies or members of the Fifth Column.

Robert Hayes and Hubert Massie, recipients of the Soldier’s Medal
  • Article by Samuel de Korte
  • Published on July 4th, 2020

Robert Hayes and Hubert Massie, recipients of the Soldier’s Medal

During World War II, soldiers of the warring nations were distinguished for behaving heroically or for exceptional achievements. However, it was very difficult for one group to gain recognition. These were African Americans among the segregated American forces. The reason for this was that they often ended up in supporting roles and were therefore kept out of the fray or because their actions were not recognized due to racist motives. There were exceptions to this, such as Robert Hayes and Hubert Massie, who managed to stand out when an emergency occurred while they were working in Canada.

Hitler's absence during the medal ceremony, Berlin 1936
  • Article by Sjoerd de Boer
  • Published on June 3rd, 2020

Hitler's absence during the medal ceremony, Berlin 1936

During the 1936 Olympic Games in Berlin, Jesse Owens, a black American athlete, decisively outperformed his German competitors and won four medals. Adolf Hitler, who was in attendance, was reportedly so enraged that he stood up and left the stadium.