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Nieuwste artikelen

Uprising and liquidation of the Warsaw Ghetto
  • Article by Kevin Prenger
  • Published on February 7th, 2021

Uprising and liquidation of the Warsaw Ghetto

When the Nazis began the final evacuation of the Warsaw ghetto on 19 April 1943, they met with fierce resistance. Jewish men and women had armed themselves and formed a fighting squad. They wanted to take revenge against the Germans who had deported their family members to the Treblinka extermination camp in the previous months. This time they decided that they would not be slaughtered without putting up a fight.

Asterdorp, the fourth ghetto of Amsterdam
  • Article by Paul van de Kar
  • Published on December 19th, 2020

Asterdorp, the fourth ghetto of Amsterdam

As in large parts of West-Europe, the population of Amsterdam also grew in the beginning of the 20th century. This increase was reflected in the housing: the small labourers’ houses where large families lived in, were bursting at the seams. These families often lived a poor life. Because of this, there was a huge need for social housing.

Chelmno
  • Article by Matthias Ouwejan
  • Published on November 21st, 2020

Chelmno

Extermination camp Chelmno – Kulmhof in German – was part of the systematic killing machine that the Nazis created in occupied Polish territories between 1939 and 1945. After the war, there was little evidence of the camp’s existence, and it was a long time before the events that unfolded there became known.

Jews hiding in Ukranian caves
  • Article by Kevin Prenger
  • Published on April 21st, 2020

Jews hiding in Ukranian caves

In 1972, the French speleologist Michel Siffre spent 205 days without interruption in a cave in Texas. With this he set an official record, because never before would someone have lived for so long underground. Living so long in constant darkness and isolation, without any sense of day or night, requires unimaginable perseverance, both mentally and physically. Nevertheless, several Jewish people in hiding in Ukraine during World War II would have lived continuously underground for much longer, namely 344 days. The American speleologist Chris Nicola discovered their remarkable story of survival.

Jewish hospital in Berlin during the Nazi period
  • Article by Kevin Prenger
  • Published on April 16th, 2020

Jewish hospital in Berlin during the Nazi period

How Jewish patients survived the war in a Jewish hospital in Berlin

Floating concentration camps in the Bay of Lübeck
  • Article by Peter Kimenai
  • Published on December 11th, 2019

Floating concentration camps in the Bay of Lübeck