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Butterfield, Samuel Leslie

Date of birth:
April 20th, 1913 (Leeds/Yorkshire, Great Britain)
Date of death:
August 11th, 1940
Buried on:
Cemetery Cimetière de L'Est Boulange-sur-Mer
Nationality:
British (1801-present, Kingdom)

Biography

Achieved 5.95 confirmed air victories.
Leslie died on Sunday 11th Aug' 1940.
Flight Commander Flt./Lt R.D.G. Wight DFC, flying Hurricane N2650, led "B" Flight of 213 Squadron consisting of himself, Sgt S.L.Butterfield DFM and Sgt E.G Snowdon into action against 61 Me 110 fighters of Gruppe 3: 15 miles South East of Portland. Flt/Lt Wight and Sgt Butterfield were killed in this action and Sgt Snowdon was forced to crash land on Lulworth ranges. 25 British pilots lost their lives on this day,the greatest loss of pilots on any day in the Battle of Britain. Squadron 213 was based at Exeter Devon on that day.
Leslie Butterfield was killed flying his Hurricane I (P3789). He was 27 and was buried at Bolougne Eastern Cemetery France plot 11 row A grave 16.

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Period:
Second World War (1939-1945)
Rank:
Sergeant
Unit:
No. 213 Squadron, Royal Air Force
Awarded on:
June 14th, 1940
Action:
Citation:
"One day in May, 1940, this airman was on patrol in company with his squadron, when some fifty or more enemy aircraft were sighted. During the engagement which ensued, he shot down two Messerschmitt 109's in quick succession. He then successfully attacked a Junkers 88, which fell into the sea. He was immediately attacked himself, by a Messerschmitt 110, and his aircraft was hit by a cannon shell, but by skilful manoeuvring and accurate shooting, he destroyed the enemy fighter. With his ammunition now expended, he set course for home but was again attacked and hit by three more cannon shells, which set his aircraft on fire. Sergeant Butterfield escaped by parachute and was picked up by a passing vessel. Throughout the engagement, though greatly outnumbered, this airman displayed great courage, outstanding initiative and determination."
Distinguished Flying Medal (DFM)

Sources

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