TracesOfWar needs your help! Every euro, pound or dollar you contribute greatly supports the continuation of this website. Go to stiwot.nl and donate!

Young, McGregor

Date of birth:
August 21st, 1911
Nationality:
Canadian (1931-present, Constitutional Monarchy)

Biography

Do you have more information about this person? Inform us!

Period:
Second World War (1939-1945)
Rank:
Major
Unit:
14th Field Artillery Regiment, Royal Canadian Artillery, 3rd Canadian Infantry Division
Awarded on:
August 19th, 1944
Recommendation:
In the assault on the Beaches and town of Bernières-sur-Mer this officer, then Action OC 14 Canadian Field Artillery Regiment proceeded through the streets on foot with his leading equipments and regardless of his own personal safety indicated many enemy strong points over “open sights” the destruction of which materially influenced the successful passage of men and material through the beach defences. Major Young has consistently done forward reconnaissance and observer work and remained in forward and exposed positions to effectively control the fire of his Regiment in initial actions against enemy counter attacks in spite of efforts to dislodge him. His cool judgment and steadfast courage has produced heavy deterrent fire, rendering great service to the infantry whom he was supporting. I consider his conduct has been both an example and inspiration to all.

Supplement to the London Gazette, 31 August, 1944.
Distinguished Service Order (DSO)
Period:
Second World War (1939-1945)
Rank:
Lieutenant-Colonel
Unit:
4th Canadian Field Regiment, Royal Canadian Artillery, 2nd Canadian Infantry Division
Awarded on:
November 10th, 1945
Distinguished Service Order (DSO)
Recommendation:
Lieutenant-Colonel Young has commanded 4 Canadian Field Regiment Royal Canadian Artillery throughout the operation by 2 Canadian Infantry Division in Germany in February, March and April.
During this period, in addition to commanding his regiment, Lieutenant-Colonel Young has acted as the Divisional Artillery Commander’s representative with 4 Canadian Infantry Brigade.
In the battles south of Cleve which culminated in the clearing of the Hochwald Forest and the capture of Xanten, Lieutenant-Colonel Young frequently had under his control several regiments of artillery as well as his own. He invariably handled all these resources with great skill and judgment. On several occasions in order to maintain efficient control he remained at his wireless continuously for 48 hours without rest of any kind. Whenever there were lulls in the battle he took the opportunity to visit his representatives and observers with the forward battalions and companies to encourage them and ensure that the artillery support for the leading troops was the best possible. These visits very often took him over roads under shell fire and into observation posts which were being fired upon by the enemy. His coolness under fire and complete disregard of personal danger was always an inspiration to those around him.
After crossing the Rhine and during the drive by 2 Canadian Division to Groningen the rapid advance required the most careful deployment of his regiment in order to provide continuous support. Lieutenant-Colonel Young’s excellent control and skillful handling of his regiment was such that the forward troops were never out of range of his guns. Many enemy pockets were thus quickly overcome and momentum of the advance was maintained.
Lieutenant-Colonel Young’s cool courage, sound tactical judgment and thorough knowledge of artillery have instilled great confidence in all those who worked with him and he has made a major contribution to the many successes achieved by 4 Canadian Infantry Brigade.

This award was obtained in the form of an Bar to be attached on the ribbon of the first award.
Supplement to the London Gazette, 24 January, 1946.

Sources

Photo