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Hollard, Michel

    Date of birth:
    July 10th, 1898 (Epinay/Eure, France)
    Date of death:
    July 16th, 1993 (Ganges/Hérault, France)
    Nationality:
    French

    Biography

    Michel Hollard was born in Epinay, July 10th, 1898, the son of Auguste Hollard and Pauline Monod.
    Michel Hollard served in World War 1. After the war he was employed as an engineer by Maison Gazogène Autobloc, a company manufacturing generators for gas produced from wood.
    1941 he established the Réseau Agir, a network for counterespionage in France. Februari 1944 he was caught by the Germans and tortured in the Fresnes prison before being transferred to the concentrationcamp Neuengamme as prisoner F 33.948. April 30th, 1945, he was taken away on board the vessel Magdalene and later on transferred to the vessel Thielbek. May 3rd, 1945 the vessel was attacked by British Hawker Typhoons of 198 Squadron and sunk. Michel Hollard surrvived the attack.
    After the war he was promoted to Colonel. Michel Hollard became famous by a statement from Sir Brian Horrocks who called him “the man who literally saved London” because of his work as a spy concerning V-1 launch sites.
    Michel Hollard passed away July 16th, 1993.

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    Period:
    Second World War (1939-1945)
    Awarded on:
    1987
    Action:
    Among other duties, received for his work during the Second World War.
    Commandeur de l' Ordre National de la Legion d'Honneur
    Period:
    Second World War (1939-1945)
    Rank:
    Capitaine de Réserve (Captain of Reserves)
    Action:
    Citation:
    "This officer in January 1942 organised and conducted, with the greatest skill and devotion for two years, a highly successful information service in favour of the Allied cause in Nothern France. He, at great personal risk, reconnoitred a number of heavily guarded "V.1." sites and reported thereon with such clarity that moedelf thereof were constructed in this country which enabled effective bombing to be carried out.
    His courage, devotion to duty and unsparing efforts were a constant inspiration to his team.
    Finally arrested in February 1944 by treachery, he was deported to Germany, from where, after severe privations and despite torture under which he revealed nothing, he succeeded recently in excaping."
    Distinguished Service Order (DSO)

    Sources

    • Photo 1: onbekend
    • Photo: unknown
    • - Hollard, F., Michel Hollard: le Français qui a sauvé Londres, Le cherche midi, 2005, ISBN 2-74910-387-8

    Photo