Museum Piana delle Orme

The Museum is situated near the city of Latina, to be exact, right between Borgo Faita and Borgo St. Michele. The museum park has a surface of approximately 25.000 square meters but is not completely dedicated to the Second World War. The park has been divided into a large number of pavilions, each with its own theme. Those subjects do not only cover World War II but are also concerned with toys (such as military modeling), old agricultural machines and tools (amongst which 300 different tractors), the draining of the Pontanian marches (drained in the 1930s under the reign of Benito Mussolini) and the daily life in those days. But it needs to be stated that whatever has been exposed regarding the Second World War is of outstanding quality. In the various pavilions dioramas depict how Italy became involved in the war, the course of the North African campaigns, the amphibian landing of the allied troops near Anzio, the battle for Monte Cassino etc. etc..
Two pavilions have been completely dedicated to the exposition of military vehicles from that period. Although they are arranged in an odd way (in rows behind each other), they are in mint condition. Many vehicles are mostly of allied origin and of course of Italian manufacture. In the yard you will find a Fairchild C-119 the "Flying Boxcar", although these military transport planes derive from the after war period. It is impressive to experience the running of the engines.
The museum park is well maintained and contains also a little restaurant and a pick nick area. The collectors of World War Two military items can make their choice in a large shop. The Museo Piana della Orme (The museum of the plains of the River Orme) is a true gem in the Latina region in spite of the fact that it is not totally dedicated to the war. But because of its large collection the World War Two fan will find it certainly worth his while!

For current visiting hours, please visit the website of the museum.

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Source

  • Text: Kees Jan Koster
  • Photos: Kees Jan Koster