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Dorr, Hans

    Date of birth:
    April 7th, 1912 (Sontheim/Schwaben, Germany)
    Date of death:
    March 21st, 1945 (Teillazerett "Silvana" Baden, Austria)
    Nationality:
    German (1933-1945, Third Reich)

    Biography

    The Command Post of Hans Dorr was hit by artillery fire in January 1945. Many officers died on the spot and Hans Dorr got wounded severey. As an effect of this he died on 17-04-1945 in a Field hospital near Judenburg. Probably he also was awarded the Nahkampfspange in Gold, however, no conformation of this has yet been found. In total Hans Dorr was injured 16 times during the war.

    Promotions:
    May 1st, 1933: SS-Anwärter;
    October 1st, 1934: SS-Sturmmann;
    June 1st, 1935: SS-Rottenführer;
    November 15th, 1935: SS-Unterscharführer;
    April 20th, 1937: SS-Scharführer;
    April 1st, 1938: SS-Standartenjunker;
    August 12th, 1938: SS-Standartenoberjunker;
    November 9th, 1938: SS-Untersturmführer;
    January 30th, 1940: SS-Obersturmführer;
    November 9th, 1941: SS-Hauptsturmführer;
    November 9th, 1943: SS-Sturmbannführer;
    August 18th, 1944: SS-Obersturmbannführer.

    Career:
    April 1933: 3. Sturm, I. Sturmbannes, SS-Sturm 29, SS-Verfügungstruppe, Ottobrunn;
    January 1934 - May 1934: 6. Landespolizei-Hundertschaft, München;
    July 1934 - September 1934: 2. Sturm, SS-Standarte 1 „Deutschland";
    October 1st, 1934: Unterführer-Anwärter Lehrgang, III. Sturmbann, SS-Standarte 2 „Germania";
    December 1934: III. Sturmbann, SS-Standarte 2 „Germania";
    November 1935: Gruppen- und stellvertretender Zugführer, III. Sturmbann, „SS-Germania";
    October 1937: Junkerlehrgang, SS-Junkerschule Bad Tölz;
    August 1st, 1938 - september 1938: Zugführer-Lehrgang, Dachau;
    October 1938: Zugführer, 10. Kompanie, III. Bataillon, SS-VT „Germania", Radolfzell;
    November 5th, 1939: Führer 10. Kompanie, III. Bataillon, SS-VT „Germania";
    February 15th, 1940: Ordonnanzoffizier, III. Bataillon, SS-Standarte „Germania", SS-Verfügungsdivision;
    May 25th, 1940: wounded;
    September 1st, 1940: Führer, Krad-Erkundungs-Zug, SS-Regiment „Germania";
    September 15th1940: Führer, 1. Kompanie, I. Bataillon, SS-Regiment (mot.) „Germania";
    November 1940: SS-Division "Wiking";
    June 1st, 1942: Chef, 4. Kompanie, I. Bataillon, SS-Infanterie-Regiment „Germania";
    February 20th, 1943: SS-Panzer-Grenadier-Ersatz-Bataillon „Germania";
    April 1st, 1943: Kommandeur, I. Bataillon, SS-Infanterie-Regiment „Germania";
    May 27th, 1944: Kommandeur, SS-Panzer-Grenadier-Regiment 9 „Germania".

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    Period:
    Second World War (1939-1945)
    Rank:
    SS-Untersturmführer (2nd Lieutenant)
    Unit:
    Führer, 10. Kompanie, III. Bataillon, SS-Verfügungstruppe „Germania", Waffen-SS
    Awarded on:
    November 14th, 1939
    Eisernes Kreuz 2. Klasse
    Period:
    Second World War (1939-1945)
    Rank:
    SS-Obersturmführer (Lieutenant)
    Unit:
    Ordonnanzoffizier, III. Bataillon, SS-Standarte „Germania", SS-Verfügungsdivision, Waffen-SS
    Awarded on:
    August 20th, 1940
    Eisernes Kreuz 1. Klasse
    Period:
    Second World War (1939-1945)
    Rank:
    SS-Obersturmführer (Lieutenant)
    Unit:
    Führer, 1. Kompanie, I. Bataillon, SS-Regiment (mot.) „Germania", SS-Division "Germania", Waffen-SS
    Awarded on:
    October 20th, 1940
    Verwundetenabzeichen 1939 in Schwarz
    Period:
    Second World War (1939-1945)
    Rank:
    SS-Obersturmführer (Lieutenant)
    Unit:
    Führer, 1. Kompanie, I. Bataillon, SS-Regiment (mot.) „Germania", SS-Division "Germania", Waffen-SS
    Awarded on:
    August 29th, 1941
    Verwundetenabzeichen 1939 in Silber
    Period:
    Second World War (1939-1945)
    Rank:
    SS-Obersturmführer (Lieutenant)
    Unit:
    1. Kompanie, I. Bataillon, SS-Regiment "Germania", SS-Division "Wiking", Waffen-SS
    Awarded on:
    December 19th, 1941
    Award 34/34.
    Deutsches Kreuz in Gold
    Period:
    Second World War (1939-1945)
    Rank:
    SS-Hauptsturmführer (Captain)
    Unit:
    1. Kompanie, I. Bataillon, SS-Regiment "Germania", SS-Division "Wiking", Waffen-SS
    Awarded on:
    April 20th, 1942
    Silver version
    Infanterie-Sturmabzeichen
    Period:
    Second World War (1939-1945)
    Rank:
    SS-Hauptsturmführer (Captain)
    Unit:
    1. Kompanie, I. Bataillon, SS-Regiment "Germania", SS-Division "Wiking", Waffen-SS
    Awarded on:
    April 20th, 1942
    Verwundetenabzeichen 1939 in Gold
    Period:
    Second World War (1939-1945)
    Rank:
    SS-Hauptsturmführer (Captain)
    Unit:
    Chef, 4. Kompanie, I. Bataillon, SS-Regiment "Germania", SS-Division "Wiking", Waffen-SS
    Awarded on:
    September 1st, 1942
    Medaille
    Period:
    Second World War (1939-1945)
    Rank:
    SS-Hauptsturmführer (Captain)
    Unit:
    Chef, 4. Kompanie, I. Bataillon, SS-Regiment "Germania", SS-Division "Wiking", Waffen-SS
    Awarded on:
    September 27th, 1942
    Awarded for distinguishing himself during the advance to the Caucasus in 1942. After his small Kampfgruppe had stormed a village he made the independent decision to carry the advance forwards to the Kuban river despite the fierce Soviet resistance. He and his troops reached the river, crossed it under heavy fire in rubber boats and created a bridgehead on the opposite bank that would be of great importance for the further operations of the Division.
    Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes
    Period:
    Second World War (1939-1945)
    Rank:
    SS-Hauptsturmführer (Captain)
    Unit:
    Kommandeur, I. Bataillon, SS-Panzergrenadier-Regiment "Germania", SS-Panzergrenadier-Division "Wiking", Waffen-SS
    Awarded on:
    September 15th, 1943
    Nahkampfspange in Bronze
    Period:
    Second World War (1939-1945)
    Rank:
    SS-Hauptsturmführer (Captain)
    Unit:
    Kommandeur, I. Bataillon, SS-Panzergrenadier-Regiment "Germania", SS-Panzergrenadier-Division "Wiking", Waffen-SS
    Awarded on:
    November 13th, 1943
    Dorr’s Oakleaves recommendation reads as follows…

    “SS-Hauptsturmführer Dorr was awarded the Knight’s Cross to the Iron Cross for his crossing of the Kuban river and creation of a bridgehead at Grigeripoliskaja on the 02.08.1942.

    On the 08.08.1942 SS-Hauptsturmführer Dorr received the order to launch an advance with his Kampfgruppe (1 Schützen-Kompanie, 1 heavy Kompanie, 1 armoured car Kompanie, 1 Batterie of LFH howitzers) from Tengenskaja via Belescherskaja to Maikop. There he was to link up with the Vorausabteilung of the 16. Infanterie-Division (mot), commence an advance to Tuapse alongside this unit and block the coastal road Noworossisk-Tuapse.

    Moving out on the 09.08.1942, SS-Hauptsturmführer Dorr thrust through the enemy forces that were fleeing southward from the northern front of the Kuban river over the course of 2 violent days. The much larger enemy threatened to crush the Kampfgruppe on several occasions, however every time SS-Hauptsturmführer Dorr succeeded in mastering the most confusing of situations with confidence and bravery.

    By the evening of the 10.08.1942 SS-Hauptsturmführer Dorr had fulfilled the first part of his mission, having made contact with the Vorausabteilung of the 16. Infanterie-Division (mot).

    On the 15.08.1942 SS-Hauptsturmführer Dorr once again moved out. The Kampfgruppe was subordinated to the 97. Jäger-Division as a Vorausabteilung. It’s new mission was to advance via Apscheronskaja to Muk through the 40 km wide forest belt in order to make contact with the southernmost attacking spearhead of the SS-Pz.Gren.Div. Wiking. Kampfgruppe Dorr fought through the forest zone between Maikop and Apscheronskaja in a bitter 4-day battle, eliminated much superior enemy forces and opened the path for the 97. Jäger-Division to Muk. Toughly defended and mined tree barricades over a distance of 15 km could not stop the irresistible forward drive of the Kampfgruppe. SS-Hauptsturmführer Dorr constantly inspired his men to their greatest achievements through his own personal example. He appeared at the hotspots of the fighting whenever the attack ground down under the energetic enemy defensive fire, entering the close combat with machine-pistol and hand grenades and bringing the Kampfgruppe’s attack back into motion. His tireless, selfless devotion to duty played a major role in securing a decisive success, namely the clearing out and occupation of the oil area Maikop-Chadzhenskaja.

    On the 17.03.1943 the enemy launched a surprise crossing over the Donez river between Ssemenowka and Bol Garaschewka with strong infantry forces. They penetrated into the positions of the 259. Infanterie-Division and tried to force a breakthrough towards Barwenkowo with swiftly brought up tank forces. When the Regiment commenced its attack against the broken-in enemy on the 18.07.1943, Dorr’s Bataillon received orders to attack northwards from Barabaschewka against Ssredny and eliminate the enemy located there. They would then turn westwards and seize the decisive Soviet crossing point, the bridge at Bol Garaschewka.

    Moving out in the early morning, the Bataillon succeeded in seizing Ssredny from the enemy through a bold and energetically conducted thrust. The Bataillon cleared the village following bitter urban combat and destroyed major hostile elements. After securing the village the Bataillon pivoted towards the west as ordered, but it soon ran into a Soviet tank-led counterattack from the direction of Bol Garaschewka. At the same time the Bataillon received murderous defensive fire from the northern bank of the Donez river, which prevented the Bataillon from carrying out its plan as intended. A forward advance appeared to be out of the question.

    It would once again be SS-Hauptsturmführer Dorr who would master the dangerous situation through his fearlessness and tactical skill. He gathered up a few MG squads, overcame the enemy’s blocking fire as the first in the line and then stormed Hill 64.8 (located 2 km northwest of Ssredny) with his troops while fighting with his own machine-pistol and hand grenades. The capture of this hill was of decisive importance for the continuation of this attack. SS-Hauptsturmführer Dorr was wounded during the last phase of the attack against Hill 64.8, however he stayed in the foremost line and gave his orders and instructions for the continued attack against the bridge position. He only gave himself up for medical attention at the orders of the regimental commander.

    SS-Hauptsturmführer Dorr and his Bataillon had a major share in the constriction of the bridgehead on this day, as well as in the destruction of significant enemy forces.

    On the 19.09.1943 the Regiment took up a security position on both sides of the Chorol—Krementschug road, however its sheer width (12 km) meant that it could only be occupied in a strongpoint-like fashion. Bataillon Dorr, deployed on the left, deployed one Kompanie each to occupy strongpoints at Kutarshicha, Bairak and the Mogilen hill (1 km north of Worschio-Jenki).

    On the night of the 20./21.09.1943 the enemy, utilizing the extremely good terrain conditions, succeeded in entering the rear of strongpoint Bairak (occupied by 2. Kompanie with a combat strength of only 25 men) with 200 men of their own, and they then began to roll up the strongpoint from the rear. 2. Kompanie was forced to abandon Bairak and pull back towards the south. Then SS-Hauptsturmführer Dorr arrived on the battlefield. He gathered up the remainder of the heavily depleted Kompanie, brought a heavy infantry gun into position and began a counterthrust. Once more fighting at the spearhead with machine-pistol and grenades, he succeeded in seizing the southern part of Bairak from the Soviets. However despite strong friendly artillery support the enemy’s resistance stiffened, and our own counterthrust came to a halt. An immediately launched Soviet counterthrust threatened to encircle the small group.

    However, thanks to the shining example of their commander, the Kompanie was inspired to fight with determination to the last man. SS-Hauptsturmführer Dorr and his remaining men succeeded in holding the southern part of Bairak long enough for a friendly self-propelled gun Kompanie to arrive from the Regiment. SS-Hauptsturmführer Dorr then resolved to immediately renew his own assault. He swiftly issued orders, mounted up onto the first self-propelled gun and commenced the renewed attack.

    The Soviets were bewildered by the energetically executed thrust, and began to pull back while also defending each house bitterly. The commander’s vehicle received a direct hit, with the entire crew being either killed or badly wounded. Only the commander himself got away with minor injuries. Undeterred, SS-Hauptsturmführer Dorr stormed forwards on foot and continued to prosecute the assault until Bairak was once again in friendly hands. The Soviets repeatedly tried again to seize Bairak, however they were bloodily repulsed every time. The enemy was once again badly battered by the fighting. Dorr’s Bataillon thus had a major share in the successes of the Division in the Chorol sector. Over the course of several days of furious struggle the enemy’s breakthrough attempts towards Krementschug had been prevented.

    The enemy succeeded in occupying the 2 km long Dnieper island located 4 km southeast of Pekari (south of Kannew).

    By orders of the III. Panzer-Korps, Dorr’s Bataillon was attached to the 57. Infanterie-Division in order to help liquidate the enemy’s presence on the Dnieper island.

    After hastily assembling for the fight the Bataillon launched its attack early on the 27.09.1943. They overcame a sandbank, the only connection to the island, and succeeded in securing the island’s southern tip in a swift strike. However the difficult terrain, comprised of stunted trees and thick undergrowth, favoured the the defense and our own attack became heavily compromised. A man to man battle ensued, one that was fanatically prosecuted by both sides. The enemy attempted to break up the attack via bitterly conducted counterthrusts. However SS-Hauptsturmführer Dorr held the Bataillon together with an iron hand, and mastered the difficult situations with his by-now legendary calm. When the Soviets finally managed to overrun 3. Kompanie in a counterthrust, SS-Hauptsturmführer Dorr at once rushed to the site with 2 squads from 2. Kompanie and plunged into the broken-in enemy. The foe was crushed after an hour of gruelling combat. The front of 3. Kompanie was closed and our own attack could once again proceed.

    An enemy group of about 100 men that suddenly appeared in the rear of the Bataillon was destroyed/dispersed by SS-Hauptsturmführer Dorr and the swiftly assembled messengers of the Bataillon staff. Dorr’s Bataillon ultimately managed to eliminate the enemy forces (about 300 men strong) over the course of a 10-hour battle. By nightfall the island was firmly in friendly hands. The Soviets had sustained heavy losses in men, equipment and weapons.

    On the 30.09.1943 Dorr’s Bataillon was attached to the 3. Panzer-Division in order to eliminate the bridgehead east of Studinez (10 km north of Kannew). The Bataillon’s mission was to eliminate the enemy forces in the bridgehead and take control of the west bank of the Dnieper.

    Following a strong friendly artillery preparation the 3. Panzer-Division moved out at 06:40 on the 02.10.1943. After a short yet fierce engagement Dorr’s Bataillon reached its first attack objective, the ravine east of Point 175.9. However the friendly forces on the left and right received strong fire from anti-tank guns and mortars. They were forced to go to ground, and eventually went back to their jump-off positions. Clearly recognizing the situation, the enemy launched a counterattack to interfere with these retreat movements. Dorr’s forward Kompanien took up all-round defensive positions in the ravine, however they were encircled by the enemy’s counterattack. The Bataillon’s situation was critical. The neighbouring groups once again went over to the attack, but made no better progress. An exhausted Kampfgruppe was similarly unable to reach the encircled elements of Dorr’s Bataillon.

    SS-Hauptsturmführer Dorr thus launched his own attack towards the encircled elements of his Bataillon at 18:30 with 4 Sturmgeschützen. After bitter close combat the enemy’s encirclement ring was broken, and this permitted the encircled units to retreat to the lines of the neighbouring groups. The wounded were secured and taken to a safe place. The relief of these encircled elements is solely attributable to the abilities of the Bataillon commander, one highly respected by his men.

    The courage and dutifulness of SS-Hauptsturmführer Dorr was enough to merit recognition by the commander of the 3. Panzer-Division, Generalleutnant Westhoven, as is clear from a personal letter he wrote to the commander of the SS-Pz.Gren.Div. Wiking, SS-Brigadeführer Gille:

    ‘The irrepressible SS-Hauptsturmführer Dorr has achieved commendable merit through his prudent and yet brave attitude, and through these attributes he has brought valuable documents into the hands of the higher commands.’

    SS-Hauptsturmführer Dorr has thus had an outstanding share in the successes of his Bataillon and by extension the Regiment as a whole through his personal courage, decisiveness and calm, even in the most critical of moments.

    I hold SS-Hauptsturmführer Dorr as one worthy to bear the Oakleaves to the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross.”
    327th Award.
    Ritterkreuz mit Eichenlaub
    Period:
    Second World War (1939-1945)
    Rank:
    SS-Sturmbannführer (Major)
    Unit:
    Kommandeur, SS-Panzergrenadier-Regiment 9 "Germania", 5. SS-Panzer-Division "Wiking", Waffen-SS
    Awarded on:
    July 9th, 1944
    Dorr’s Swords’ recommendation reads as follows…

    “1.) Orlowez (31.01.-05.02.1944):

    Strong enemy attacks in the sector of the 57. Infanterie-Division necessitated that the Korps pull back its front from Smela to Orlowez. SS-Pz.Gren.Rgt. 9 Germania was deployed east of Orlowez for defense. The Soviets were favoured by the hilly and ravine-covered terrain, and they were able to assemble strong forces before the Regiment’s frontline and then immediately use them for an attack against Orlowez. A bitter struggle ensued, one which lasted for 6 days. The Soviets launched multiple attacks each day with a varying strength of 400-1000 men against the thin lines of the Regiment, however every time these attacks faltered against the determined defense.

    The high-water mark of the battle for Orlowez was on the night of the 02./03.02.1944, wherein the Soviets commenced an overwhelming attack against Hill 202.4 (located southeast of Orlowez). An enemy regiment, heavily supported by artillery, was to advance along a narrow front through Orlowez and onto Gorodischtsche. Their success here would deliver the deathblow to the bitterly fighting defenders of the pocket. Following ferocious close combat the Soviets succeeded in getting onto Hill 202.4, located in the sector of II. Bataillon. The enemy attempted to expand their breach with swiftly brought-up reserves.

    Undeterred by the strong enemy attacks against the front of his own Bataillon, SS-Sturmbannführer Dorr decided to remove units from his own Bataillon’s line and use them for an immediate counterthrust in the sector of II. Bataillon. A reinforced Zug launched such a maneuver under his personal leadership. Firing an MG from the hip, SS-Sturmbannführer Dorr stormed ahead of his Zug and halted the enemy forces that had entered into Orlowez. A Zug from II. Bataillon then launched an attack against the point of penetration in order to close the breach. The attack succeeded, and the enemy units behind our now closed front were surrounded. After a hard, 12-hour long night battle it was possible to eliminate the trapped enemy forces while defeating all attempted hostile breakout and relief efforts. The destroyed enemy group sustained losses as follows:

    5 guns (7.5 cm)
    6 guns (4.7 cm)
    13 heavy machine-guns
    9 heavy mortars
    300 dead (counted)
    83 prisoners.

    2.) Arbusino (09.-11.02.1944):

    The Regiment was deployed in the Arbusino area, east of Korsun. On the 10.02.1944 it received the order to hand over its sector to the SS-Pz.Gren.Rgt. 10 Westland and in turn take over a sector of frontline near Schanderowka.

    The relief was supposed to take place on the night of the 10./11.02.1944. However the enemy situation before Regiment Westland prevented a timely completion of such a maneuver, and so it lasted until the morning of the next day. For their part the enemy had been spotted bringing up reinforcements on the previous two days and setting up assembly areas. They did not fail to notice the relief maneuver and the opportunity it provided, and so they launched an attack with strong forces at 05:00 on the 11.02.1944. The defending I. Bataillon, being weakened in its defensive readiness by the ongoing relief movement, defended fiercely but was unable to prevent an enemy penetration. The foe was quick to send in additional forces with the ultimate aim of pushing ahead to Arbusino and taking the bridge located there. From here they could break through to Korsun itself. As such the Division decided to immediately pull back Regiment Westland to the Arbusino river.

    Recognizing the gravity of the situation, SS-Sturmbannführer Dorr at once launched a counterthrust on his own initiative with 1. Kompanie (which had already been taken out of the line) in order to ensure that the withdrawal to the new position could go according to plan. He and his men assailed the enemy’s lead elements, threw them back in an energetic attack and captured a commanding hill northeast of Arbusino. Control of this hill was decisive. If the enemy had been able to set up observation posts here they would have been able to bring down observed fire on the Arbusino river. From the ranks of his small group SS-Sturmbannführer Dorr bitterly defending this high ground until the Regiment Westland had occupied the Arbusino sector. Then 1. Kompanie and its Bataillon commander pulled back to this same position while under continual fire from the hotly pursuing enemy.

    3.) Schanderowka (12.-14.02.1944):

    At 00:00 on the 12.02.1944 the Regiment was deployed for an attack against Schanderowka. Its mission was to launch a surprise attack during the night that would take control of this city, which was heavily occupied and strongly fortified by the enemy. The intent of the higher commands was: Secure the required assembly areas for the later breakout from the pocket through the capture of the city. The success of this assault was therefore of truly decisive importance. In addition to an enemy flamethrower battalion, already identified through friendly reconnaissance, the enemy had also brought up an infantry regiment for the defense of the city. Dorr’s Bataillon launched a wide flanking maneuver towards the south, and it was the first to break through the strong Soviet defensive ring (reinforced with several flamethrower barriers) and enter into the southern part of the city. There the initially surprised Soviets commenced a counterthrust. A bitter round of close combat ensued, one that lasted throughout the entire night. The friendly attack stalled. At daybreak the Soviets plastered the part of the village our forces had taken with heavy fire from all available weapons.

    Strong enemy air units supported the defenders in their battle. Resupply to our friendly elements that had entered Schanderowka was not possible, as all approach routes were dominated by the enemy’s fire. Our own artillery was likewise not able to deliver effective support to our hard-pressed infantry as observation posts could not be set up due to the unfavourable terrain. Despite being totally isolated SS-Sturmbannführer Dorr remained undeterred by these difficulties, and prepared for a renewed friendly assault on the night of the 12./13.02.1944. Our brave group of troops pressed forwards against the much superior enemy in a gruelling 12-hour night battle. Newly set up flamethrower barriers and minefields were overcome, and the enemy forces in the northern part of the city were pushed back.

    However during the morning the attack once again ground to a halt under the strong enemy defensive fire after it had made it to the village centre. Over the course of the whole day the enemy’s tank-led counterthrusts were defeated with high losses for the foe. SS-Sturmbannführer Dorr prepared for the last, decisive attack against the northern part of the city, which was to take place on the following night starting at 22:00. Ultimately both the city and the commanding high ground to the west of it was wrested from the enemy. This decisive attack succeeded thanks to the energy, toughness and outstanding bravery of SS-Sturmbannführer Dorr. Always being with his men in the foremost line by both day and night, he was a permanent example of courage, endurance and confidence. In this manner he in turn inspired his men to praiseworthy achievements.

    The following was destroyed or captured:

    13 guns (7.5 cm)
    20 guns (4.7 cm)
    10 guns of all calibers
    3 tanks
    Over 70 heavy machine-guns
    37 mortars
    The load-out of an infantry regiment and a flamethrower battalion
    Over 300 enemy dead (counted)
    150 prisoners.

    4.) Nowo-Buda (15.-16.02.1944):

    After the capture of Schanderowka the heavily fought-out units of the Regiment were forced to immediately move towards the south. There they relieved elements of the 72. Infanterie-Division, cleared out the enemy-occupied southern part of Nowo-Buda and went over to the defense on the hills south of the village.

    Following the capture of Schanderowka the enemy force-marched new units from the east and assembled them in the Morenzy area. They then began offensive operations on the 15.02.1944, supported by strong tank forces. Their aim was to thrust through to Schanderowka via Nowo-Buda and smash our own breakthrough forces that had been assembled in the area.

    Over the course of a bitter 2-day struggle all enemy attacks were fended off, mostly in close combat. SS-Sturmbannführer Dorr again outstandingly distinguished himself here. I. Bataillon found itself in the focus of the defensive battle. The weakly held front of the Regiment was broken through several times; however SS-Sturmbannführer Dorr repeatedly launched counterthrusts with hastily assembled shock units and resolved every critical situation. The enemy took heavy losses in men and materiel. Two enemy tanks were destroyed.

    Here follows a captured report from the 5th Guards Red Banner Don-Cossack Cavalry Corps to the supreme commander of the 2nd Ukrainian Front concerning the Guards Cavalry Don-Cossack Regiment 47, which was deployed near Nowo-Buda:

    ‘The bitter enemy artillery and mortar fire inflicted heavy losses on the regiment. The soil of Nowo-Buda flows with Cossack blood.’

    5.) Breakthrough from the pocket west of Cherkassy (17.02.1944):

    At 03:00 on the 17.02.1944 the Regiment (along with the subordinated Brigade ‘Wallonien’) commenced its breakthrough towards Lissjanka as the rearguard of the Division. Located far away from the attacking spearheads of the Division, the Regiment had the mission of smashing the attack of the Soviet reserves that now appeared on the battlefield while also forcing the breakout itself. The Korps units deployed to guard the flanks of the breakout wedge failed in their duties, and so the enemy succeeded in thrusting north to south and capturing the commanding ridges at Chilkie and Komarowka. Now every new friendly attack became pinned down under the enemy fire.

    Thus SS-Sturmbannführer Dorr commenced an attack against the high ground north of Chilkie with his Bataillon on his own initiative. The hill was stormed with blank weapons. Through this decisive deed the breakout path through Chilkie that had been temporarily occupied by the enemy was free. The forward movement of all regimental elements as well as the withdrawal of the hard-pressed rearguards from the 57. Infanterie-Division was now possible.

    Later on in the breakout the Dshurshenzy—Potschapinzy road became blocked by 12 enemy tanks. Another 7 enemy tanks bypassed the Regiment to the north and laid down a murderous fire on all friendly units located amongst the coverless terrain. Lingering here for any length of time would have led to extremely high losses, a fact SS-Sturmbannführer Dorr was well aware of. He thus assembled his Bataillon together and fearlessly stormed against the 12 tanks with blank weapons. Panzerfaust in hand, he inspired his men forwards through the strong enemy fire and personally destroyed a T-34. This deed, unexcelled in either courage or guts, was the shining beacon for thousands of German soldiers. They assailed the firing line of the enemy tanks, overran all enemy resistance and reached the protection of the woods east of Oktjabr with minor losses. This led to a union with the friendly relief forces located at Lissyanka.

    6.) Attack against the western part of Kovel and Hill 189.5 (17.04.1944):

    During the fighting for ‘Fortress Kowel’ the enemy succeeded in taking over the western part of the city and Hill 189.5, located to the west of Kowel. The high ground around 189.5 was particularly dominating, and offered excellent observation possibilities for the enemy against the supply routes to Kowel. For his reason it was secured with a deeply-layered defensive system and several mine belts. As such, in order to deny the enemy their grip on the city and its supply routes, an operation was ordered to take place on the 17.04.1944. The aim was to seize the high ground and clear out the western part of the city.

    The Kampfgruppe of SS-Sturmbannführer Dorr was assigned to attack Hill 189.5.

    The unit moved out at 02:30, and it moved swiftly along the Kowel—Cholm railroad. It was not long before it had captured the enemy strongpoints located 1200 metres south of the railroad junction. It was now possible to launch the friendly attack against Hill 189.5 in a southerly direction. Sturmbannführer Dorr personally led the assault units and, achieving total surprise, they were able to enter into the enemy defensive system with blank weapons. The totally surprised enemy were pushed out of their important positions and fled to the high ground towards the south. SS-Sturmbannführer Dorr immediately took advantage of this favourable situation. He pursued the fleeing enemy and succeeded in also capturing the high ground after a bloody engagement. Now acting on his own initiative, he oriented a Kompanie towards the east. This unit entered into the western part of Kowel from the north and threw the enemy back towards the south. This decisive deed enabled the attack of the second group against the western part of Kowel (which had been pinned down by the enemy’s heavy defensive fire) to once again come into motion. The enemy was thrown back here as well, and the ordered attack objective was reached.

    It was once again the personal intervention and outstanding bravery of SS-Sturmbannführer Dorr that was decisive for this successful outcome. The western part of the Fortress was completely cleared of the enemy, a commanding hill position taken and the friendly supply activity secured from the interference of the enemy.”
    77th Award.
    Ritterkreuz mit Eichenlaub und Schwertern

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