Campbell, John Charles "Jock"

Date of birth:
January 10th, 1894 (Thurso/Caithness, Scotland)
Date of death:
February 26th, 1942 (Sidi Rezegh, Libya)
Buried on:
Commonwealth War Cemetery Cairo
Plot: K. Grave: 171.
Service number:
13594
Nationality:
British (1801-present, Kingdom)

Biography

Major General John Campbell was killed in a car accident in Libya.

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Period:
First World War (1914-1918)
Rank:
Acting Captain
Unit:
U Battery, 16th Army Brigade, Royal Horse Artillery
Awarded on:
June 3rd, 1919
Military Cross (MC)
Period:
Second World War (1939-1945)
Rank:
Temporary Lieutenant-Colonel
Unit:
Royal Horse Artillery
Awarded on:
April 1st, 1941
Action:
Citation (general):
"For distinguished services in the Middle East during the period August, 1939, to November, 1940."
Mentioned in Despatches
Period:
Second World War (1939-1945)
Rank:
Temporary Lieutenant-Colonel
Unit:
Royal Horse Artillery
Awarded on:
April 1st, 1941
Distinguished Service Order (DSO)
Action:
Citation (general):
"In recognition of distinguished services in the Middle East, during the period August 1939 to November 1940."
Period:
Second World War (1939-1945)
Rank:
Major
Unit:
Royal Horse Artillery
Awarded on:
April 25th, 1941
Distinguished Service Order (DSO)
Details:
Second DSO awarded as a bar.
WO 373/17/69
Period:
Second World War (1939-1945)
Rank:
Temporary Lieutenant-Colonel
Unit:
Royal Horse Artillery
Awarded on:
December 30th, 1941
Mentioned in Despatches
Period:
Second World War (1939-1945)
Rank:
Brigadier
Unit:
The Royal Horse Artillery, British Army
Awarded on:
October 20th, 1942
Action:
Citation:
"In recognition of most conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty at Sidi Rezegh on the 21st and 22nd November, 1941.
On the 21st November Brigadier Campbell was commanding the troops, including one regiment of tanks, in the area of Sidi Rezegh ridge and the aerodrome. His small force holding this important ground was repeatedly attacked by large numbers of tanks and infantry. Wherever the situation was most difficult and the fighting hardest he was to be seen with his forward troops, either on his feet or in his open car. In this car he carried out several reconnaissances for counter-attacks by his tanks, whose senior officers had all become casualties early in the day. Standing in his car with a blue flag, this officer personally formed up tanks under close and intense fire from all natures of enemy weapons.
On the following day the enemy attacks were intensified and again Brigadier Campbell was always in the forefront of the heaviest fighting, encouraging his troops, staging counter-attacks with his remaining tanks and personally controlling the fire of his guns. On two occasions he himself manned a gun to re-place casualties. During the final enemy attack on the 22nd November he was wounded, but continued most actively in the foremost positions, controlling the fire of batteries which inflicted heavy losses on enemy tanks at point blank range, and finally acted as loader to one of the guns himself.
Throughout these two days his magnificent example and his utter disregard of personal danger were an inspiration to his men and to all who saw him. His brilliant leadership was the direct cause of the very heavy casualties inflicted on the enemy. In spite of his wound he refused to be evacuated and remained with his command, where his outstanding bravery and consistent determination had a marked effect in maintaining the splendid fighting spirit of those under him."
Details:
Brigadier Campbell’s Victoria Cross is publicly displayed at the Royal Artillery Museum in Woolwich, Great Britain.
Later promoted to the rank of Major General.
Killed in action on 26 February 1942, Libya.

Victoria Cross (VC)

Sources

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