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Sismore, Edward Barnes

    Date of birth:
    June 23rd, 1921 (Kettering/Northhamptonshire, Great Britain)
    Date of death:
    March 22nd, 2012
    Service number:
    130208
    Nationality:
    British (1801-present, Kingdom)

    Biography

    Ted Sismore joined the RAF in 1939. On 31st January 1943 he was navigator on board one of three Mosquitos bombing Berlin for the first time. Timed to disrupt a speech by Hermann Goering for over an hour.
    In May 1943 Sismore navigated the attack on the Zeiss Optical factory and the glassworks in Jena.
    He also planned the route for the famous Amiens prison raid (Operation Jericho), and master-navigated all three Gestapo raids in Denmark (Aarhaus, Shellhus and Odensa).
    After the war Sismore remained in the Royal Air Force and with Squadron leader Mick Martin broke the flying record for the London to Cape Town, 6,727 mile journey, completing it in 21 hours and 31 minutes. He was later awarded the Royal Aero Clubs Britannia Trophy for 1947. In 1962 Sismore was promoted to Group Captain and later became Station Commander of RAF Bruggen in Germany and in the late 1960s became commanding Officer of the Royal Air Forces Central Reconnaissance Establishment at RAF Brampton.

    Post war decoration:
    31 mei 1956: Air Force Cross

    Promotions:
    Augustus 29th, 1942: Pilot Officer (probation/emergency)
    February 28th, 1943: Flying Officer (probation/war sub)
    August 28th, 1944 : Flight Lieutenant (war sub)
    September 1st, 1945: commissioned als Flying Officer
    July 1st, 1946: Flight Lieutenant
    January 1st, 1951: Squadron Leader
    January 1st, 1957: Wing Commander
    July 1st, 1962: Group Captain
    July 1st, 1971: Air Commodore
    June 23th, 1976: retirement

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    Period:
    Second World War (1939-1945)
    Rank:
    Pilot Officer
    Unit:
    No. 105 Squadron, Royal Air Force
    Awarded on:
    February 16th, 1943
    Citation:
    "On the 30th January, 1943, two forces of bombers were detailed to attack Berlin, one during the morning and the other during the afternoon.
    To reach the German capital necessitated a flight of more than 500 miles, mostly over heavily defended territory. Close co-ordination and precise timing were essential but, such was the skill exhibited, that the target was reached and the attacks delivered within seconds of the specified time. That complete success was achieved, despite opposition from the ground defences, is a high tribute to the calm courage, resolution and endurance displayed by the following officers and airmen who, in various capacities, acted as members of the aircraft crews."
    Distinguished Flying Cross (DFC)
    Period:
    Second World War (1939-1945)
    Rank:
    Acting Flight Lieutenant
    Unit:
    No. 139 (Jamaica) Squadron, Royal Air Force
    Awarded on:
    June 18th, 1943
    Distinguished Service Order (DSO)
    Recommendation:
    "On 27th May, 1943, this Officer was Navigator of the leading aircraft of a formation of 14 detailed to attack targets at Jena, Germany, in daylight. The total distance was 1,100 miles, over 500 of which were to be covered at very low level in daylight, through strong defences, both from the ground and the air, in occupied and enemy territory. Weather conditions were not as expected, being very clear over the first part of the route, but deteriorating badly towards the target. Visibility was reduced to less than a mile for the last 150, and was not more than half a mile for the last 40.
    In spite of these difficulties, Flying Officer Sismore navigated with extreme accuracy, and finally brought the formation up to the target along the pre-arranged run. The attack was made at low level in the face of very heavy anti-aircraft defences and balloons. Over the target itself, a light anti-aircraft shell burst in the cockpit, wounding the Pilot. Flying Officer Sismore coolly rendered First Aid, and helped the Pilot to maintain control of the aircraft. He then continued his accurate navigation, and the aircraft returned safely to base.

    This Officer was Navigator of the leading aircraft of a formation which attacked Berlin in daylight, arriving precisely at the scheduled time. Since then, he has completed 11 successful sorties, all of which have called for the highest degree of navigational skill at low level. All crews of the formation which carried out the attack on Jena are unanimous in saying that it was a magnificent navigational feat in face of difficulties.
    I strongly recommend the immediate award of the Distinguished Service Order."
    Period:
    Second World War (1939-1945)
    Rank:
    Acting Squadron Leader
    Unit:
    Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve
    Awarded on:
    December 14th, 1944
    Distinguished Flying Cross (DFC)
    Citation:
    "As pilot and navigator respectively these officers have taken part in numerous sorties against a wide I variety of targets. In October, 1944, they took part in a most successful attack on a vital German target. In this well executed operation, these officers displayed skill and resolution of the highest standard.

    Second DFC awarded as a bar for on the ribbon of the first FC.
    Simultaneously awarded to the pilot, Acting Wing Commander Reginald Wilfred Reynolds DSO DFC.
    Period:
    Second World War (1939-1945)
    Rank:
    Acting Squadron Leader
    Unit:
    Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve
    Awarded on:
    June 2nd, 1945
    Distinguished Flying Cross (DFC)
    Citation:
    "In March, 1945, Squadron Leader Sismore was the navigator in the leading aircraft of a large formation detailed to attack the Gestapo headquarters at Copenhagen. The operation, necessitating a flight of more than 1,000 miles demanded the highest standard of navigational ability. In this direction, Squadron Leader Sismore's work was outstanding and contributed materially to the success obtained. Again, in April, 1945, this officer flew with great distinction in an attack against a similar target at Odense. This officer, who completed much operational flying, has rendered very valuable service."

    Third DFC awarded as second bar for on the ribbon of the first DFC.
    Period:
    Second World War (1939-1945)
    Rank:
    Squadron Leader
    Unit:
    Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve
    Awarded on:
    March 18th, 1949
    Ridder af Dannebrog
    Period:
    Second World War (1939-1945)

    With "FRANCE AND GERMANY" clasp.
    Air Crew Europe Star
    Rank:
    Squadron Leader
    Awarded on:
    May 31st, 1956
    Air Force Cross
    General Service Medal 1918-1962
    Period:
    Second World War (1939-1945)
    Rank:
    Flight Lieutenant
    Air Efficiency Award (AE)

    Sources

    • Photo 1:
    • Photo: Find A Grave
    • - Second Supplement to The London Gazette Issue 35904 published on the 12 February 1943
      - Third Supplement to The London Gazette Issue 36059 published on the 15 June 1943
      - Third Supplement to The London Gazette Issue 36839 published on the 12 December 1944
      - Fifth Supplement to The London Gazette Issue 37142 published on the 19 June 1945
      - The London Gazette Issue 38565 published on the 18 March 1949
      - Supplement to The London Issue 40787 published on 25 May 1956
      - Cranston Fine Arts Aviation, Military and Naval Art
      - Robert Taylor Aviation Prints
      - Wikipedia
      - Spink

    Photo